The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Immiserizing Growth

  • Jagdish N. Bhagwati
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_1233

Abstract

The theory of immiserizing growth has been developed by theorists of international trade, though it has recently been the focal point of research also by mathematical economists. It is central to understanding several important paradoxes in economic theory and has significant policy implications.

Keywords

Autarky Directly Unproductive Profit-seeking (DUP) activities Distortions Free trade Immiserizing growth Shadow pricing Tariffs Tariff seeking Terms of trade 

JEL Classifications

F1 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jagdish N. Bhagwati
    • 1
  1. 1.