Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics

Living Edition
| Editors: David M. Kaplan

Aesthetic Value, Art, and Food

  • Carolyn KorsmeyerEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6167-4_23-3

Synonyms

Introduction

Can a meal be a work of art? Do eating and drinking afford experiences that qualify as “aesthetic”? If so, how do the artistic or aesthetic aspects of foods relate to ethical issues? While moral questions about eating have been under philosophical discussion for a long time, its place in aesthetics is more recent, and the relationship between ethical and aesthetic value is as contentious with food as it is with art.

Eating is both a biological necessity and a cultural practice. Every living creature must nourish itself; however, necessary sustenance often comes at the expense of the life of some other living thing. This fact alone opens ethical questions if one considers eating another sentient creature a practice with moral standing. What is more, habits of eating reflect upon character – for eating can be greedy or abstemious, convivial or solitary, enthusiastic or inattentive. Questions about...

Keywords

Eating Disorder Philosophical Tradition Moral Standing Aesthetic Quality Aesthetic Judgment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyUniversity at Buffalo, Philosophy, SUNY-BuffaloBuffaloUSA