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The Wetland Book pp 1299-1306 | Cite as

The Sudd (South Sudan)

  • Lisa-Maria Rebelo
  • Asim I. El Moghraby
Reference work entry

Abstract

The Sudd is one of the largest floodplains in Africa and one of the largest tropical wetlands in the world. It is located in South Sudan, and forms part of the White Nile, or Bahr el Jebel river system, which originates in the African Lakes Plateau. Derived from an Arabic word meaning obstacle or blockage of river channels, the Sudd is composed of a maze of wetland ecosystems. The wetland supports high levels of biodiversity. Located on the eastern flyway between Africa and Europe/Asia, the Sudd is one of the most important wintering grounds in Africa for Palaearctic migrants. While variations in rainfall contribute to annual changes in the extent of the Sudd, long-term variations in the amount of water discharged from the East African lakes are the main source of changes in the system with impacts on habitats and plant composition in the channels, lagoons, and seasonal floodplain areas.

Keywords

Ramsar South Sudan Sudd Wetland 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Water FuturesInternational Water Management InstituteVientianeLao People’s Democratic Republic
  2. 2.Regional Office for Southeast Asia and the MekongInternational Water Management InstituteVientianeLao People’s Democratic Republic
  3. 3.Sudanese National Academy of SciencesKhartoumSudan

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