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Wetlands of California’s Central Valley (USA)

  • Frederic A. Reid
  • Daniel Fehringer
  • Ruth Spell
  • Kevin Petrik
  • Mark Petrie
Reference work entry

Abstract

The Central Valley of California has a total area approximately 4.05 M ha. The drainages of this system is bordered by the Sierra and Coastal mountain ranges. Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the Central Valley contained more than 1.6 M ha of wetlands, chiefly seasonal in nature, based on winter and early-spring flooding. By 2006, over 83,000 ha of managed seasonal and semipermanent wetlands exist. Securing adequate surface water supplies is the most significant challenge facing public and private wetland managers in the Central Valley.

Keywords

California Central valley Seasonal wetland Wintering waterfowl Riparian and Floodplain habitats 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederic A. Reid
    • 1
  • Daniel Fehringer
    • 1
  • Ruth Spell
    • 1
  • Kevin Petrik
    • 1
  • Mark Petrie
    • 1
  1. 1.Ducks Unlimited, Inc.Rancho CordovaUSA

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