Financial Incentives for Wetland Protection and Restoration

Reference work entry

Abstract

Wetland protection policies across the world lack specific, comprehensive national wetland laws. Relying on laws intended for other purposes, federal statutes regulating or protecting wetlands have evolved over the years. This chapter explores financial incentives for wetland protection and restoration.

Keywords

Ramsar convention Economics Regulation Wetland mitigation 

References

  1. Babcock H. Federal wetlands regulatory policy: up to its ears in alligators. Pace Envtl L Rev. 1991;8:307.Google Scholar
  2. Bolger JL. Creating economic incentives to preserve unique ecosystems: should Wisconsin adopt a private wetlands mitigation policy? Marq L Rev. 2000;83:625.Google Scholar
  3. Bosselman F. Swamp swaps: the “second nature” of wetlands. Envtl L. 2009;39:577.Google Scholar
  4. Corporate Wetlands Restoration Partnership Website, at http://www.coastalamerica.gov/text/cwrp.html
  5. Defenders of Wildlife, Saving Biodiversity: A Status Report on State Law, Policies, and Programs, § 2, 1996.Google Scholar
  6. Dunec JL. Economic incentives: alternatives for the next millennium. Nat Resour Environ. 1998;12:292–3.Google Scholar
  7. Federal Guidance for the Establishment, Use and Operation of Mitigation Banks, Federal Register 1995;60:58605–58614.Google Scholar
  8. Gardner RC. Banking on entrepreneurs: wetlands, mitigation banking, and takings. Iowa Law Rev. 1996;81:540–2.Google Scholar
  9. Gardner RC. Rehabilitating nature: a comparative review of legal mechanisms that encourage wetland restoration efforts. Cathol Univ Law Rev. 2003;52:573.Google Scholar
  10. Harness C. The Future of Freshwater Wetlands. S.C. Law. 1991;3:33–36.Google Scholar
  11. McHugh. Management of estuarine fishes. Am Fish Soc Spec Pub. 1966;3:133–54.Google Scholar
  12. Mitsch WJ, Gosselink JG. Wetlands. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold; 1993.Google Scholar
  13. Morrisette PM. Conservation easements and the public good: preserving the environment on private lands. Nat Resour J. 2001;41:373–4.Google Scholar
  14. Odell D. A helping hand for waterfowl. 55 N.Y. ST. CONSERVATIONIST 9. 11 Apr 2001.Google Scholar
  15. Sapp WW. The supply-side and demand-side of wetlands mitigation banking. Or Law Rev. 1995;74:951, 978–80.Google Scholar
  16. Sokolove RD, Thompson PR. The future of wetland regulation is here. Real Estate LJ. 1994;32:78–9.Google Scholar
  17. Stern S. Encouraging conservation on private lands: a behavioral analysis of financial incentives. Ariz Law Rev. 2006;48:541–5.Google Scholar
  18. Tiner. Wetlands of the United States: current status and recent trends. US Fish Wildl Serv Habitat Resour. 1984;19:13–27.Google Scholar
  19. Whitsitt SJ. Wetlands mitigation banking. Environ Law. 1997;3:441, 445–6.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dwayne O. Andreas School of LawBarry UniversityOrlandoUSA

Personalised recommendations