South Africa’s National Wetland Rehabilitation Programme: Working for Wetlands

Reference work entry

Abstract

Like many other countries, South Africa has experienced high levels of wetland loss and degradation as a result of human activities. A vehicle through which to undertake much needed extensive wetland rehabilitation was provided through government’s Expanded Public Works Programme, which seeks to provide work and training to significant numbers of unemployed people. The resulting programme, Working for Wetlands, now invests substantial public funding in the rehabilitation and wise use of wetlands in a manner that maximizes employment creation, supports small emerging businesses, and transfers skills to its beneficiaries. A series of case studies produced through a four year research programme illustrates some of the benefits of this work, including improved livelihoods, protection of agricultural resources, enhanced biodiversity, cleaner water and reduced impacts from flooding.

Keywords

Wetland rehabilitation South Africa Working for Wetlands Programme Poverty reduction Livelihoods 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.South African National Biodiversity InstitutePretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.Department of Environmental AffairsPretoriaSouth Africa

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