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Ramsar Convention: Ramsar Site Designation Process

  • David A. Stroud
Reference work entry

Abstract

The designation of Wetlands of International Importance is one of the three “pillars” of the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention). A primary motivation for the establishment of the Convention in the 1970s was the progressive loss of wetlands and negative consequences for biodiversity. One means of addressing this was to establish a mechanism by which states could commit to protect the most important wetlands in their territory (complemented by the wise use of all other wetlands). With sites designated under the World Heritage Convention, it is one of only two legal mechanisms for the global recognition of sites of international importance for biodiversity.

Keywords

Ramsar Convention Ramsar Sites Wetlands of International Importance Designation Protected areas 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Joint Nature Conservation CommitteePeterboroughUK

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