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Egler’s $10,000 Succession Challenge

  • John Anderson
Reference work entry

Abstract

Frank Egler was a proponent of a variant of Gleasonian succession called “initial floristics,” which suggests that the early establishment of plant species has a great influence on later vegetation succession. In contrast, Clementsian succession suggests that vegetation progresses in stages to a climax. Historically, this idea has been widely held by teachers and managers, but Egler did not observe this type of succession. Egler offered a $10,000 reward for anyone who could give an example of vegetation stages progressing to a climax stage in support of Clementsian succession. No one has successfully challenged Egler’s concept. Initial floristics as a variant of Gleasonian succession has withstood many decades of scrutiny.

Keywords

Climax Clementsian succession Gleasonian succession Individualistic concept Initial floristics Relay floristics 

References

  1. Allred W, Clements ES. Dynamics of vegetation. NY: H.W. Wilson; 1949.Google Scholar
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  4. Egler FE. The plight of the rightofway domain: victim of vandalism. Part 1. Mt. Kisco: Futura Media Services; 1975.Google Scholar
  5. Gleason HA. The individualistic concept of the plant association. Torrey Bot Club Bull. 1926;53:7–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Aton ForestNorfolkUSA

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