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“Quality” in Headache Care: What Is It and How Can It Be Measured?

  • Michele Peters
  • Crispin Jenkinson
  • Suraj Perera
  • Elizabeth W. Loder
  • Timothy J. Steiner
Reference work entry

Abstract

Evaluating quality of health care is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to the advancement of health-care delivery, and there is general agreement that achieving and maintaining high quality in health care must be primary aspirations. Yet surprising uncertainty surrounds the meaning of “quality.” Undoubtedly, it has multiple dimensions, which is problematic because improvement in one dimension may be at the expense of others. A variety of instruments and a range of methods are available to assess quality of care. These are described here, along with research directed specifically at quality in headache care. Quality indicators for headache developed in the past have been largely limited to diagnosis and treatment in specific health-care settings, or to specific types of headache. They cannot necessarily be transferred between settings; neither is quality of headache care reflected only in accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Adherence to local guidelines, sometimes stipulated as the path to quality, may not achieve quality if these guidelines are not themselves well rooted in quality. For these reasons, a group of health-services researchers and headache specialists have collaborated in formulating a set of quality indicators for headache care, intended to be applicable across countries, cultures, and settings so that deficiencies in headache care worldwide may be recognized and rectified. Equally important is that these indicators will guide the development of headache services in countries that lack them.

Keywords

Quality Indicator Headache Disorder International Headache Society Headache Care Stakeholder Representative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Lifting The Burden 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michele Peters
    • 1
  • Crispin Jenkinson
    • 1
  • Suraj Perera
    • 2
  • Elizabeth W. Loder
    • 3
  • Timothy J. Steiner
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Health Services Research Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary CareUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  2. 2.Ministry of Health Care & NutritionColomboSri Lanka
  3. 3.Division of Headache and Pain, Department of NeurologyBrigham and Women’s/Faulkner HospitalsBostonUSA
  4. 4.Department of NeuroscienceNorwegian University of Science and TechnologyTrondheimNorway
  5. 5.Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College LondonLondonUK

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