CIRP Encyclopedia of Production Engineering

Living Edition
| Editors: The International Academy for Production Engineering, Sami Chatti, Tullio Tolio

Self-Propelled Rotary Tool

  • Hossam A. Kishawy
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-35950-7_16820-1

Synonyms

Definition

Self-propelled rotary tool (SPRT) is a general term which is usually entitled to a family of round cutting tools in the form of circular inserts that spin around their axis during machining operation (Shaw et al. 1952; Venuvinod and Rubenstein 1983; Armarego et al. 1991, 1993, 1994a, b). The SPRTs offer a superior performance over the conventionally used cutting tools where the tool rotates continuously which provides a fresh part of the cutting edge into the cutting area. The insert spinning around its center provides a way for carrying the fluid to the tool point as in the case of a journal bearing. This rotation allows the tool to be cooled down; hence, it significantly reduces the adverse effects of temperature on the tool life as well as the workpiece surface quality. In addition, employment of self-propelled rotary tools results in a higher material removal rate (MRR) in machining difficult to cut materials such as...

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References

  1. Armarego E, Smith A, Karri V (1991) Mechanics of cutting model for simulated oblique rotary tool cutting processes. J Mater Process Technol 28(1):3–14CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Armarego E, Karri V, Smith A (1993) Computer-aided predictive models for fundamental rotary tool cutting processes. CIRP Ann Manuf Technol 42(1):49–54CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Armarego E, Karri V, Smith A (1994a) Fundamental studies of driven and self-propelled rotary tool cutting processes – I. Theoretical investigation. Int J Mach Tools Manuf 34(6):785–801CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Armarego E, Karri V, Smith A (1994b) Fundamental studies of driven and self-propelled rotary tool cutting processes – II. Experimental investigation. Int J Mach Tools Manuf 34(6):803–815CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Kishawy H, Wilcox J (2003) Tool wear and chip formation during hard turning with self-propelled rotary tools. Int J Mach Tools Manuf 43(4):433–439CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Kishawy H, Becze C, McIntosh D (2004) Tool performance and attainable surface quality during the machining of aerospace alloys using self-propelled rotary tools. J Mater Process Technol 152(3):266–271CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Kishawy H, Pang L, Balazinski M (2011) Modeling of tool wear during hard turning with self-propelled rotary tools. Int J Mech Sci 53(11):1015–1021CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Shaw M, Smith P, Cook N (1952) The rotary cutting tool. Trans ASME 74(Aug):1065–1076Google Scholar
  9. Venuvinod P, Rubenstein C (1983) The principle of equivalent obliquity and its application to rotary cutting. CIRP Ann Manuf Technol 32(1):53–58CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© CIRP 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Automotive, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Applied ScienceUniversity of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT)OshawaCanada

Section editors and affiliations

  • Garret O’Donnell
    • 1
  1. 1.Trinity College DublinDublinIreland