Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

Living Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Sexuality and the Hebrew Bible

  • Mark HarrisEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27771-9_9367-2

The Hebrew Bible, called the Law (Torah), the Writings (Kethuvim), and the Prophets (Nevi’im) by Jews and the Old Testament by Christians, has had a profound impact on religion throughout the world. It encompasses 39 separate books written by dozens of authors over 1,000 years. The Hebrew Bible comprises over half of the Christian Bible, is referenced hundreds of times in the Quran, and has even influenced Hinduism through the conquests of Alexander and the travels of Hebrews and Christians. As such, its views on sexuality impact thought and action far beyond its traditional roots.

To study a religion is, in part, to study its source of authority. Common sources of religious authority include scriptures, traditions, words, and deeds of important people past and present, and the lived experience (what people actually think, say, do, and experience) of its adherents over time. The reader must also consider his or her interpretive framework (hermeneutic). Will words be understood...

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© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Southern Baptist Theological SeminaryLouisvilleUSA