The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism

Living Edition
| Editors: Immanuel Ness, Zak Cope

Ben Bella, Ahmed (1918–2012)

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-91206-6_293-1
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Definition

This essay explores the life and work of Algerian politician, soldier, revolutionary, and first President of Algeria Ahmed Ben Bella (1918–1912).

From 1830 to 1962 Algeria was a French colony. The French occupation was marked by a long period of bloody conquest, and a mixture of disease and violence caused the indigenous population of Algiers to decline by a third between 1830 and 1872. Arab Algerians were discriminated against and were denied basic rights while hundreds of thousands of Europeans emigrated to Algeria. Under French colonialism two societies evolved in Algeria, a Muslim society based on a traditional economy and a European society which was heavily dependent on French capital and markets but also relied on Muslim labour. The two societies had relations of extreme inequality. French authorities had introduced capitalist property relations in landholding in the late nineteenth century, and...

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References

  1. Horne, A. (1977). A savage war of peace; Algeria 1954–1962. New York: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  2. Merle, R. (1967). Ben Bella. London: Michael Joseph.Google Scholar
  3. Socialist Organizer. (2014, April). Algeria: Louisa Hanoune, presidential candidate of the Workers Party for President of the Republic. Socialist Organizer. http://socialistorganizer.org/algeria. Retrieved 12 Jan 2015.

Selected Works

  1. Gregory, J. R. (2012, Apr 11). Ahmed Ben Bella, revolutionary who Led Algeria after independence, dies at 93. The New York Times, national edition.Google Scholar
  2. Joffe, L. (2012, Apr 11). Ahmed Ben Bella Obituary. The Guardian.Google Scholar
  3. Kraft, J. (1961). The struggle for Algeria. New York/London: Doubleday and Company.Google Scholar
  4. Socialism Today. (2012). The struggle for Algerian independence. Socialism Today, 162 (October). http://www.socialismtoday.org/162/algeria.html. Retrieved 10 Dec 2014.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of VermontBurlingtonUSA
  2. 2.Keene State CollegeKeeneUSA