The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism

Living Edition
| Editors: Immanuel Ness, Zak Cope

Achebe, Chinua (1930–2013)

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-91206-6_289-1
  • 65 Downloads

Definition

Chinua Achebe, born Albert Chinualumogu Achebe in Ogidi in eastern Nigeria on 16 November 1930, was a writer, novelist, poet, and critic.

Chinua Achebe, born Albert Chinualumogu Achebe in Ogidi in eastern Nigeria on 16 November 1930, was a writer, novelist, poet, and critic. Achebe’s father Isaiah Okafo Achebe was baptised by the missionaries of the Church Missionary Society and took on missionary teaching. His mother Janet Iloegbunam Achebe belonged to the blacksmith community of Umuike village in Awka. Achebe excelled at school and won a scholarship for higher studies. He graduated in English Literature in 1953 from the University College in Ibadan.

After a short span of teaching at the Merchants of Light School at Oba, Achebe joined the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation in 1954. He was subsequently elevated to the position of director of external broadcasting in 1961, attained ‘the Voice of Nigeria’ position, and served the corporation until the 1966 Igbos massacre in...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Achebe, C. (1972). Interview with Lewis Nikosi. In C. Pieterse & D. Duerden (Eds.), African writers talking (p. 4). London: Heinemann Educational.Google Scholar
  2. Achebe, C. (1975). ‘The novelist as teacher’, Morning yet on creation day (pp. 67–73). New York: Doubleday.Google Scholar
  3. Achebe, C. (1994 [1958]). Things fall apart. New York: Anchor Books.Google Scholar
  4. Achebe, C. (2010). An image of Africa: And, the trouble with Nigeria. London: Penguin.Google Scholar
  5. Gera, A. (2001). Three great African novelists. New Delhi: Creative Books.Google Scholar
  6. Gikandi, S. (1991). Reading Chinua Achebe: Language and ideology in fiction. London: J. Currey.Google Scholar
  7. Jaggi, M. (2000). Profile of Chinua Achebe. The Guardian, pp. 6–7 (18 November 2000).Google Scholar
  8. King, B. (1972). Introduction to Nigerian literature. New York: Africana Publishers Corporation.Google Scholar
  9. Nare, M. A. (2005). Things fall apart: An archetypal novel. In M. K. Ray (Ed.), Studies in literature in English (Vol. 11, pp. 137–151). New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers and Distributors.Google Scholar
  10. Pieterse, C., & Duerden, D. (Eds.). (1972). African writers talking. London: Heinemann Educational.Google Scholar

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EnglishSchool of Languages, Literature and Culture Central University of PunjabBathindaIndia