The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism

Living Edition
| Editors: Immanuel Ness, Zak Cope

Black Panthers

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-91206-6_190-1
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Definition

Since arriving on American shores, struggle has characterised much of African and African-American people’s experience globally and in the US. Blacks’ struggle against political subjection and domination has characterised much of their social relations with the capitalist world economy, has been ongoing, and has taken multiple forms. It has been black resistance to racism and oppression which has been the major form of protest to the domination of black peoples since the sixteenth century. It is in this context that we must situate the resistance and struggle of the Black Power Movement (BPM) over time more generally and the Black Panther Party (BPP) more specifically.

Introduction

Since arriving on American shores, struggle has characterised much of African and African-American people’s experience globally and in the US. Blacks’ struggle against political subjection and domination has characterised much of their social relations with the capitalist world economy, has been...

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State University of New YorkOneontaUSA