The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism

Living Edition
| Editors: Immanuel Ness, Zak Cope

Eurocentrism and Imperialism

  • Johannes Dragsbaek Schmidt
  • Jacques HershEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-91206-6_120-1

Introduction

Human development is a process whereby transformations take place as a result of social change and political struggle between opposing forces. It would be naive to believe that the process of transformation is the result of a painless natural selection progression. Historians in the Marxist tradition are aware of the dialectics of history-making as the result of the balance of forces between different actors/agencies in a social formation. In the worlds of Karl Marx:

Men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please; they do not make it under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past. (Marx (1852/1958): 247)

Not only is history made under conditions not chosen by the people involved, but interpretations of the transformation processes confront each other and reflect an arena of struggle where opposing positions face each other. This axiom applies with equal strength, or even more forcibly, in...
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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Aalborg UniversityCopenhagenDenmark
  2. 2.Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, Copenhagen UniversityCopenhagenDenmark
  3. 3.Research Center on Development and International RelationsAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark