Affordable and Clean Energy

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Amanda Lange Salvia, Tony Wall

Civilian Uses and Challenges of Nuclear Energy

  • Salvin Paul
  • Wangchu Lama
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71057-0_48-1
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Synonyms

Definition

Nuclear energy can simply be defined as the source of power which is emitted from energy that is released by nuclear reaction. Nuclear energy is present in the nucleus of an atom that is obtained through a process of nuclear fission or nuclear fusion. Nuclear fission occurs when an atom is separated into lighter atoms with the help of nuclear reactors; a net loss of mass occurs that further gets converted to a massive amount of energy. On the other hand, nuclear fusion occurs when two small atoms combine to produce a heavier atom and energy (Ward n.d.). Atoms in nuclear plants are split continuously generating huge amount of sustainable energy for a longer period of time.

Origin and Evolution of Nuclear Energy

One of the imperative issues that the international community is facing in the present era is that of energy security. Fossil fuels continue to play a major role in the global...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Salvin Paul
    • 1
  • Wangchu Lama
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Peace and Conflict Studies and ManagementSikkim UniversityGangtokIndia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Justin Bishop
    • 1
  1. 1.ArupLondonUK