Affordable and Clean Energy

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Amanda Lange Salvia, Tony Wall

Access to Modern Energy Services for the Promotion of Sustainable Development

  • Fernanda Torres Volpon
  • Ely Caetano Xavier JuniorEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71057-0_2-1
  • 116 Downloads

Definitions

According to the International Energy Agency (2019c), energy access can be defined as reliable and affordable access to the energy services necessary to supply the basic needs of daily life. This definition is usually understood as comprising access to clean cooking facilities and to electricity. These services are considered vital instruments to reduce poverty, improve economic growth, and promote social rights. Therefore, energy access has been placed at the core of the UN Sustainable Development Goal 7.

Considering that access to electricity and access to clean cooking facilities are the two main pillars of the most common “energy access” definition, they serve as essential parameters to measure the achievement of energy-related sustainable development goals. Access to electricity corresponds to initial access of a household to sufficient electricity for a basic bundle of services with the level of service being capable of growing over time. Access to clean cooking...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fernanda Torres Volpon
    • 1
  • Ely Caetano Xavier Junior
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Law SchoolRio de Janeiro State UniversityRio de JaneiroBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Legal SciencesFederal Rural University of Rio de JaneiroSeropédicaBrazil

Section editors and affiliations

  • Luciana Londero Brandli
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Passo FundoPasso FundoBrazil