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The Influence of Information and Communication Technology Use on Students’ Information Literacy

  • Akira Sakamoto
Reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

In this chapter, the concept of information literacy and research findings on the impact of children’s use of ICT (information and communication technology) on information literacy are introduced, with a focus on Japan and including comparisons to other parts of the world. A general explanation of information literacy is first provided; then the concept, history, measurement, and other issues of information literacy are described. The findings of Japanese empirical research on the impact of children’s ICT use on information literacy are detailed and aligned with major international research findings and orientations on the issues of impact of ICT use. Major findings are as follows: (a) ICT use can improve information competencies, in particular abilities to collect and evaluate information; and (b) it appears that ICT use at school could be more effective than ICT use at home, but even the use at home has effects which cannot be ignored. Findings contribute additional evidence of causality to the current body of literature based primarily on large international studies addressing the issues of the educational impact of ICT use through data gathered across many educational systems but from each subject just one time.

Keywords

Information literacy ICT use Quasi-experiment Panel study Japanese research 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyOchanomizu UniversityTokyoJapan

Section editors and affiliations

  • Gerald Knezek
    • 1
  • Rhonda Christensen
    • 2
  1. 1.University of North TexasDentonUSA
  2. 2.University of North TexasDentonUSA

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