Gender Equality

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Tony Wall

Female Migration and the Global Economy

  • Elizabeth KiesterEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70060-1_5-1

Definition

Female migration refers to the women who either voluntarily or involuntarily leave their homes and often their families behind when they go in search of better, safer living conditions or financial means for supporting their families. These migrations can occur both internally and internationally. While men have been the primary economic migrants for generations, it is the rising labor market demand for female migrants and what happens to their families in their absence that has scholars more invested in understanding the significant role women are playing in the global economy.

Introduction

For the past 40 years, global migration has been on the rise. Recent studies suggest that international migration doubled between 1985 and 2005, from 55 to 120 million (Martin and Zurcher 2008). Between 1990 and 2008, migration to the United States accounted for over 30% of population growth and almost 50% of labor force growth. During this same period, temporary workers rose from...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyAlbright CollegeReadingUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Melissa Haeffner
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Science and ManagementPortland State UniversityPortlandUSA