Global Encyclopedia of Territorial Rights

Living Edition
| Editors: Michael Kocsis

Stateless Persons and the UN High Commission for Refugees

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-68846-6_51-1
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Synonyms

Definition

Stateless persons rely on the UN High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) as the primary organization responsible to address statelessness.

A stateless person is someone who is not a national of any State (Staples 2012). International law, in particular, defines a stateless person as someone “who is not considered as a national by any State under the operation of its law” (Article 1(1) of the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons). This definition of what is known as de jure (in law) statelessness is adopted in other treaties and legislation and is considered customary international law (Foster and Lambert 2016). However, it does not include de facto (in practice) stateless persons who may have the documentation to prove citizenship yet are unable or unwilling to rely on the State for protection afforded to other citizens (Bianchini 2018). Defining statelessness continues to be...

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Notes

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References

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Osgoode Hall Law SchoolYork UniversityTorontoCanada

Section editors and affiliations

  • Kevin W. Gray
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TorontoTorontoCanada