Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

Living Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Physical Disabilities

  • Erica McConnell
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-56782-2_1474-3

Short Description/Definition

According to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA 1990), disability is defined as a “physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, or a record of such an impairment, or being regarded as having such an impairment” (McIntosh and Decker 2005). Although the ADA indicates that documentation of an impairment is required, it does not elaborate on which disabilities qualify for services under ADA. According to the Federal Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, students with physical disabilities would qualify for services under other health impairment (Section 300.8(c)(9)), orthopedic impairments (Section 300.8(c)(8)), and deaf-blindness, deafness, or visual impairment including blindness, if the child’s educational performance is adversely affected without receiving appropriate assistive technology, personal assistive services, or accommodations to the physical environment (http://idea.ed.gov/explore/search...

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References and Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jefferson County Public Schools, School PsychologistGoldenUSA