Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

Living Edition
| Editors: Charles W. Finkl, Christopher Makowski

Asia, Middle East, Coastal Ecology and Geomorphology

  • Paul SanlavilleEmail author
  • Abel PrieurEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-48657-4_17-2
Between the Bosphorus to the west and the Iran-Pakistan border to the east, the coasts of the Middle East may be divided into two different provinces, the Mediterranean one to the west and the Indian Ocean one to the east. The first province concerns the Aegean and Mediterranean coasts of Turkey on the one hand and the Levantine coast on the other hand. The second province includes three rather different sectors: the western coast of the Red Sea and the coasts of the Persian Gulf, two elongated and narrow inland seas, and the Indian Ocean coasts, comprising the south Arabian coast, the Gulf of Oman, and the Makran coasts. Each of these sectors presents its own particularities together with some common characteristics, whether in tectonics, climatology, ecology, or geomorphology (Figs. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9).
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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Maison de l’Orient MéditerranéenLyonFrance
  2. 2.Centre de Paleontologie stratagraphique et PleoecologieVilleurbanne CedexFrance