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Wasteless Processing of Renewable Protein and Carbohydrate-Containing Waste into Consumer Goods

  • Aslan Tsivadze
  • Alexander Fridman
Living reference work entry

Abstract

The article presents basic principles of the chemistry and technology of alkaline hydrolysis of proteins of poisonous biologically dangerous protein and protein-containing waste, as well as decontamination and stabilization of waste through formation of compounds of amino acid copper complexes with proteins. Hydrolysates of mass production and consumption of meat, fish and milk products and processing of raw animal materials are used for obtaining metal complex bactericides, cleaning substances and detergents, household chemicals, substances for detoxification of soils contaminated with heavy metals, chloroorganic compounds, including dioxins, dust sprays and concrete reinforcement polymer fillers. The decontaminated and neutralized sewage sediment is used for producing fertile soils and filling landfills as waste-cover material and reclamation of pits. The organization of waste processing with the technology of hydrolysis or decontamination and stabilization was shown to allow obviating incineration or disposal of waste, improving the environmental friendliness of the industrial sites involved and placing cheap FMCS products into the market.

Abbreviations

BCC

Bactericide compositions on the basis of ammonia amino acid complexes of copper.

HY

A moiety in proteins consisting of an amino group of radicals of lysine, oxilysine, arginine, and histidine and a carboxyl group of radicals of glutamic and aspartic acids bound with a hydrogen ion.

MAS

Liquid compositions of molecular complexes of amino acid salts and sugars.

MPMM

Solid mixtures containing parts of polymer and textile materials, wood, metals, glass, sand, and clay.

NaL

Liquid concentrate of unseparated mixtures of amino acid sodium salts.

NaL(1)

Liquid concentrate of mixture of sodium salts of alanine, valine, glycine, leucine, isoleucine, proline, phenylalanine, arginine, histidine, lysine, oxilysine, aspartic, and glutamic acids.

NaL(2)

Liquid concentrate of sodium salts of cystine, cysteine, methionine, alanine, oxyproline, serine, tyrosine, and threonine.

NanADS

Compositions of polycomplexones of sugar amino acid derivative type.

NanIDA

Compositions of complexones which are analogues of iminodiacetic acid.

NanNDS

Compositions of polycomplexones of sugar iminodiacetic derivative type.

NanNTA

Compositions of complexones which are analogues of nitrilotriacetic acid.

OMC

Organomineral complexes from PCW-III.

PCW

Waste which contains proteins or proteins and carbohydrates.

PCW-I

Waste with protein content over 50% (on a dry basis).

PCW-II

Waste with protein content up to 50%, which contains soluble carbohydrates, cellular tissue, fats, and not over 5% of mineral components.

PCW-III

Waste with protein content 1025%, which contains 3570% of mineral components (sand, clay), 1525% of cellulose and hemicellulose, and not over 8% of fats.

PCW-IV

Waste with over 2% of protein content, which contains waste of packing and boxes of metals, glass, plastic, foil, films, cardboard, paper, wood, as well as mineral components (dust) from cleaning services.

R’s

Substituents at α-carbon in radicals of α-amino acids.

SFA

Solid compositions consisting of association complexes of salts of amino acids and fat acids (stearic, margaric, hexanoic, butyric, palmitoleic, oleic, and linoleic acids).

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© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Physical chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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