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Diseases of Poinsettia

Living reference work entry
Part of the Handbook of Plant Disease Management book series (HPDM)

Abstract

Poinsettia, Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex. Klotsch, is a major flowering potted plant for winter holidays. Because it is vegetatively propagated and is so widely grown, poinsettia diseases are relatively well known and well studied. Being a woody plant, poinsettias are not prone to tospoviruses, but they are susceptible to a wealth of foliar problems (Botrytis blight, powdery mildew, scab, Alternaria leaf spot, Xanthomonas leaf spot, and anthracnose) as well as many common root and stem diseases (Pythium and Phytophthora root rots, Thielaviopsis root rot) as well as occasional Fusarium or Rhizoctonia stem problems. Poinsettia mosaic virus (PMV) has been associated with minor problems, and a phytoplasmal infection has contributed free branching for more attractive plants. Poinsettia diseases may be managed through clean stock production coupled with integrated pest management strategies in greenhouses where the crops are propagated and finished for sale.

Keywords

Poinsettia Euphorbia pulcherrima IPM Botrytis Powdery mildew Scab Xanthomonas Pythium Poinsettia mosaic Branch-inducing phytoplasma 

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© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Section of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe BiologyCornell University, Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension CenterRiverheadUSA
  2. 2.Chase Agricultural Consulting LLCCottonwoodUSA

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