Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

Living Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Williams, Kipling D.

  • Michael BernsteinEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_1589-1

Kipling Williams

Kipling Williams (who goes by Kip, born on December 24th, 1953) is a Professor of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University in Lafayette, Indiana, and a Professor at VU University in Amsterdam. He is a social-personality psychologist who conducts research concerning ostracism, exclusion, and social rejection, social loafing, social influence, and stealing thunder. He is also interested in aggression, close relationships generally, group processes, intergroup relations, and lawger and public policy.

Educational Background

Kipling Williams earned his Bachelor of Science in Psychology at the University of Washington in 1975. He graduated with honors. In 1977, he earned his Masters of Arts in Social Psychology under the supervision of his thesis and dissertation adviser, Bibb Latané from The Ohio State University. His thesis was entitled “The Loss of Control as a Determinant of Social Loading.” Four years later, in 1981, he earned his PhD in Social Psychology from The...

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References

  1. Baumeister, R. F., DeWall, C. N., Ciarocco, N. J., & Twenge, J. M. (2005). Social exclusion impairs self-regulation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88(4), 589.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Bernstein, M. J., Sacco, D. F., Brown, C. M., Young, S. G., & Claypool, H. M. (2010). A preference for genuine smiles following social exclusion. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46(1), 196–199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chen, Z., Williams, K. D., Fitness, J., & Newton, N. C. (2008). When hurt will not heal: Exploring the capacity to relive social and physical pain. Psychological Science, 19(8), 789–795.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Hartgerink, C. H., van Beest, I., Wicherts, J. M., & Williams, K. D. (2015). The ordinal effects of ostracism: A meta-analysis of 120 Cyberball studies. PloS One, 10(5), e0127002.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Pickett, C. L., Gardner, W. L., & Knowles, M. (2004). Getting a cue: The need to belong and enhanced sensitivity to social cues. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 30(9), 1095–1107.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Twenge, J. M., Baumeister, R. F., Tice, D. M., & Stucke, T. S. (2001). If you can’t join them, beat them: Effects of social exclusion on aggressive behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81(6), 1058.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Williams, K. D., & Jarvis, B. (2006). Cyberball: A program for use in research on interpersonal ostracism and acceptance. Behavior Research Methods, 38(1), 174–180.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Williams, K. D., & Sommer, K. L. (1997). Social ostracism by coworkers: Does rejection lead to loafing or compensation? Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 23(7), 693–706.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Williams, K. D., Govan, C. L., Croker, V., Tynan, D., Cruickshank, M., & Lam, A. (2002). Investigations into differences between social-and cyberostracism. Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice, 6(1), 65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Williams, K. D. (2007). Ostracism. Annual review of psychology, 58.Google Scholar

Selected Bibliography

  1. Eisenberger, N. I., Lieberman, M. D., & Williams, K. D. (2003). Does rejection hurt? An fMRI study of social exclusion. Science, 302, 290–292.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Hales, A. H., Wesselmann, E. D., & Williams, K. D. (2016). Prayer, self-affirmation, and distraction improve recovery from short-term ostracism. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 64, 8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Williams, K. D. (2001). Ostracism: The power of silence. New York: Guilford Publications.Google Scholar
  4. Williams, K. D. (2007). Ostracism. Psychology, 58(1), 425.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Williams, K. D., & Karau, S. J. (1991). Social loafing and social compensation: The effects of expectations of co-worker performance. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 61(4), 570.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Williams, K. D., & Nida, S. A. (2011). Ostracism: Consequences and coping. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 20(2), 71–75.Google Scholar
  7. Williams, K. D., & Sommer, K. L. (1997). Social ostracism by coworkers: Does rejection lead to loafing or compensation? Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 23(7), 693–706.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Williams, K. D., Cheung, C. K., & Choi, W. (2000). Cyberostracism: Effects of being ignored over the internet. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79(5), 748.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Williams, K. D., Forgas, J. P., & von Hippel, W. (Eds.). (2005). The social outcast: Ostracism, social exclusion, rejection, and bullying. NY: Psychology Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG (outside the USA) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychological and Social SciencesPenn State AbingtonAbingtonUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Jon Sefcek
    • 1
  1. 1.Kent State UniversityKentUSA