Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

Living Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Shadow

  • John Merchant
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_1426-1

Synonyms

Definition

Jung used the word “shadow” to describe that part of the psyche which is inseparately connected to an individual but is disconnected from conscious awareness and which is composed of all that a person disavows, all that they find repugnant and disagreeable, and all that they wished others (including themselves) could not see because it runs counter to their ego ideal.

Introduction

While the shadow in Jung’s conception is underpinned by an archetype, its content is primarily derived from a person’s individuality in terms of their inherited inferior function of consciousness as well as their personal life experience to do with those aspects of their constitution which they repress. Nonetheless, the shadow not only contains much energy that can be useful to the psyche, but it can also be the conduit to the deeper layers of the collective unconscious on which a person’s individuation will depend.

Shadow Development

From a developmental...

Keywords

Outer World Dominant Function Personal Life Experience Essential Start Point Consciousness Awareness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Johnson, R. (1993). Owning your own shadow: Understanding the dark side of the psyche. New York: HarperCollins.Google Scholar
  2. Jung, C. G. (1931/2015). Letter to Count Hermann Keyserling, 13.8.31. In G. Adler & A. Jaffé (Eds.), Letters of C. G. Jung: vol 1, 1906–1950 (p. 84). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Jung, C. G. (1940/1991). Psychology and religion. In Psychology and religion: West and East, CW (Vol. 11, pp. 3–105). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  4. Jung, C. G. (1943/1990). On the psychology of the unconscious. In Two essays on analytical psychology, CW (Vol. 7, pp. 3–119). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  5. Jung, C. G. (1951/1989). The syzygy: Anima and animus. In Aion: Researches into the phenomenology of the self, CW (Vol. 9ii, pp. 11–22). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  6. Jung, C. G. (1968/1989). The shadow. In Aion: Researches into the phenomenology of the self, CW (Vol. 9ii, pp. 8–10). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  7. Jung, C. G. (1954/1990). Archetypes of the collective unconscious. In The archetypes and the collective unconscious, CW (Vol. 9i, pp. 3–41). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  8. Jung, C. G. (1954/1991). Transformation symbolism in the Mass. In Psychology and religion: West and East, CW (Vol. 11). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  9. Zimbardo, P. (2007). The Lucifer effect: Understanding how good people turn evil. New York: Random House.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Australian & New Zealand Society of Jungian AnalystsSydneyAustralia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Simon Boag
    • 1
  1. 1.MacQuarie UniversityNorth RydeAustralia