Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

Living Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Implicit Association Test

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_1133-1

Synonyms

IAT

Definition

The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is a computer-based, response-mapping task that is designed to measure the relative strength of implicit cognitive associations between four target concepts. Common applications of the IAT are for measuring implicit attitudes, prejudices, stereotypes, self-concept, and self-esteem. The IAT was developed by Greenwald, McGhee, and Schwartz in 1998 and is a widely used measure of implicit associations.

Introduction

The Implicit Association Test (IAT) was developed by Greenwald et al. (Greenwald et al. 1998) to measure implicit cognitive associations between target concepts. Drawing on evidence of distinct implicit and explicit memory systems, Greenwald and Banaji (1995) proposed that people may possess implicit attitudes, stereotypes, and self-esteem. These implicit constructs can be conceptualized, respectively, as strong cognitive associations between attitude objects and positive or negative evaluations (implicit attitudes),...

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wilfrid Laurier UniversityWaterlooCanada

Section editors and affiliations

  • Christian H. Jordan
    • 1
  1. 1.Wilfrid Laurier UniversityWaterlooCanada