Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2020 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Participatory Spirituality

  • Zayin CabotEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-24348-7_9079

Introduction

Participatory expressions of spirituality have begun to flourish over the last few decades through the collaborative efforts and individual journeys of a network of scholars and practitioners. Several authors have made important contributions to the ongoing definition of participatory spirituality (including but not limited to Ferrer 2002, 2008, 2010, 2011; Ferrer et al. 2004; Ferrer and Sherman 2008; Heron 1996, 1998, 2006; Reason 1994b, 1998b; Reason and Bradbury 2001a; Sherman 2008; Tarnas 2001, 2002). By way of orienting the definition given here, I adopt a three-question format borrowed from an earlier definition (Reason 1998b) of participatory spirituality that includes the questions of methodology, epistemology, and ontology. The order in which these questions will be introduced is not arbitrary. Important methodological and epistemological (outlined below) choices have been made within the network of those developing a participatory sensibility or participatory...

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.East-West PsychologyCalifornia Institute of Integral StudiesSan FranciscoUSA