Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2020 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Wilber, Ken

  • Leon SchlammEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-24348-7_744

Wilber’s Integral Psychology

Ken Wilber (1949) is the most influential writer in the field of transpersonal psychology (Wilber 1977, 1980, 1981a, b, 1983a, b, 1991, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000a, b, 2002, 2006), having for more than two decades been widely acclaimed as its preeminent theoretician. Working self-consciously in the tradition of such systematic philosophers as Hegel, Schelling, and Habermas, he has presented his readers with a cartography of the spectrum of consciousness which, in spite of much elaboration on his original speculative model of the development of consciousness, has continued to be one of the defining features of his integral psychology. Drawing upon an impressive variety of sources from the world’s mystical traditions (particularly Hindu and Buddhist contemplative traditions, as well as twentieth-century Indian mystics such as Ramana Maharshi and Sri Aurobindo), developmental psychology (e.g., Alexander, Arieti, Broughton, Graves, Kegan, Kohlberg,...

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of European Culture and Languages, Religious Studies SectionUniversity of KentCanterburyUK