Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2020 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Pantheism

  • Paul LarsonEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-24348-7_488
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Pantheism is the religious doctrine that the divine is infused within all existent beings. The phrase “the divine” is used as a short-hand label for both theistic (personal) and nontheistic (impersonal) definitions of the sacred ground of being. Virtually all pantheistic thought involves a belief in the immanence of the divine, though the doctrines are distinguishable. In some forms of immanence, particularly within theistic traditions, the deity is not limited to being infused into the material world; it can be beyond it as well. In the case of pantheism, however, there is an identity between the phenomenal world and the divine. God is the natural world personified.

A distinction needs to be made between true pantheism, which equates the divine with the totality of the natural world and panentheism which accepts that idea but adds that the divine is both immanent in the world yet still somehow transcendent in some manner. This view allows some “otherness” to god beyond his or her...

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Bibliography

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Chicago School of Professional PsychologyChicagoUSA