Encyclopedia of Education and Information Technologies

2020 Edition
| Editors: Arthur Tatnall

Flexible and Distance Learning

  • Maggie HartnettEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-10576-1_67

Synonyms

Introduction

Digital technologies can change major aspects of our lives including communication, socialization, and learning. The use of technology for learning in today’s world may seem a relatively recent phenomenon. It may come as a surprise to learn that the use of technology in flexible and distance contexts is not new. Fields of study that encompass distance education, online learning, human–computer interaction, and computer-supported collaborative learning have all contributed to a rapidly growing body of research that seeks to understand the experiences and behaviors of learners and faculty in technology enabled learning environments. Research to date demonstrates that the effective use of digital technologies in distance and flexible contexts is a complex endeavor.

Distance and flexible learning has a rich history that dates back decades. Findings from...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of EducationMassey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand

Section editors and affiliations

  • Don Passey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational ResearchLancaster UniversityLancasterUK