Encyclopedia of Education and Information Technologies

2020 Edition
| Editors: Arthur Tatnall

Computers in Education in Developing Countries, Managerial Issues

  • Dorothy DeWittEmail author
  • Norlidah Alias
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-10576-1_125
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Synonyms

Definition

Computers in Education in Developing Countries: Managerial issues include the inclusiveness of computers in education program for different institutions and different localities, the cost involved, transferability of the affordance of the technology implemented, and the social effects for the viability of the innovation.

Introduction

Information communications technology (ICT) has the potential to increase the productivity and economic growth of a country. The World Bank Group (WBG) (2012) has been encouraging innovations in ICT as it seems to increase a country’s competitiveness and enable economic opportunities for more IT-based services industry within the country. This is especially significant for countries with poorer economies. ICT products and services which cater directly to the society in these countries enable the diffusion of...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Curriculum and Instructional Technology, Faculty of EducationUniversity of MalayaKuala LumpurMalaysia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Javier Osorio
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran CanariaCanariaSpain