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Metabolic and Electrolyte Disorders Associated with Epileptic Seizures

  • Christian M. Korff
  • Douglas R. NordliJr.
Reference work entry

Short Description

Metabolic and electrolyte disorders are frequently associated with neurological symptoms, particularly in the setting of intensive care. Seizures and electroencephalographic abnormalities may be observed in relation with some of these disorders. Their expression is usually nonspecific and frequently reflects underlying cerebral pathogenic processes, such as edema or hemorrhage. Common findings include slowing of the background activity, disorganization, loss of reactivity, and abnormal sleep features. Most of these acute conditions are reversible and disappear, as long as the underlying cause is rapidly treated, and may therefore not require antiepileptic treatment.

Basic Characteristics

Glucose

Hypoglycemiais mostly associated with diffuse slowing of the electrographic activity. The alpha activity slowing may parallel the degree of hypoglycemia, but individual variations exist and a normal electroencephalography (EEG) may be seen with very low glucose levels....

Keywords

Hepatic Encephalopathy Diffuse Slowing Delta Activity Electrolyte Disorder Triphasic Wave 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian M. Korff
    • 1
  • Douglas R. NordliJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Pediatric Neurology, Child and Adolescent DepartmentUniversity HospitalGenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Epilepsy CenterChildren’s Memorial HospitalChicagoUSA

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