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Definitions and Classifications of Epilepsies: Overview

  • Anne T. Berg
Reference work entry

Epilepsy is a term used for a large number of disorders, all of which share the occurrence of unprovoked epileptic seizures as their defining symptom. The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) embarked on an ambitious effort to classify and catalog the various types of epileptic seizures and to classify the different disorders that lead to such seizures. The last official updates of these efforts were published in 1981 for seizures (Commission on Classification and Terminology of the International League Against Epilepsy 1981) and in 1989 for epilepsy (Commission on Classification and Terminology of the International League Against Epilepsy 1989). Efforts have been underway since to update and revise these classifications (Engel 2001, 2006) although no new classification has yet been accepted. In the spring of 2007, the Monreale workshop addressed some key dichotomies that have been established in the epilepsy vocabulary but which ultimately either needed to be discarded or at...

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne T. Berg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyNorthern Illinois UniversityDeKalbUSA

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