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Dredging Practices and Environmental Considerations

  • Craig VogtEmail author
  • Greg Hartman
Reference work entry
  • 478 Downloads
Part of the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology Series book series (ESSTS)

Glossary

Beneficial use

Placement or use of dredged material as resource materials in productive ways, which provide environmental, economic, or social benefits.

Confined disposal facility (CDF)

An engineered structure for containment of dredged material consisting of dikes or other structures that enclose a disposal area above any adjacent water surface, isolating the dredged material from adjacent waters during placement. Other terms used for CDFs that appear in the literature include “confined disposal area,” “confined disposal site,” and “dredged material containment area.”

Confined aquatic disposal (CAD)

This is a form of dredged material disposal that involves controlled placement of dredged material into a subaqueous site with some form of lateral confinement. The lateral confinement may be provided by a bottom depression or by subaqueous berms. The contaminated material is then capped in most instances with clean sediment to physically separate it from the overlying environment...

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Craig Vogt Inc, Environmental ConsultantsHacks NeckUSA
  2. 2.Hartman Associates Inc, Waterway Engineering and Sediment RemediationRedmondUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • James LaMoreaux
    • 1
  1. 1.P.E. LaMoreaux & Associates, Inc.TuscaloosaUSA

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