Nuclear Energy pp 369-393 | Cite as

Radiation Shielding

Reference work entry
Part of the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology Series book series (ESSTS)

Glossary

Albedo

A quantity describing how neutrons or photons incident on the surface of some medium (e.g., a wall) are reflected or reemitted from the surface.

Buildup factor

A factor to account for production of secondary photons in a shield. The transmitted dose from only uncollided photons times the buildup factor equals the dose from all photons, uncollided plus secondary photons.

Dose

A general term for the energy transferred from radiation to matter. Specifically, the absorbed dose is the amount of energy imparted to matter from ionizing radiation in a unit mass of that matter. Units are the gray (Gy) and rad, respectively, equivalent to 1 J/kg and 100 ergs/g.

Flux

A measure of the intensity of a radiation field. Specifically, it equals the number of radiation particles entering, in a unit time, a sphere of cross-sectional area ΔA divided by ΔA, as \( \Delta A\to 0 \)

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Books and Reviews

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Nuclear EngineeringKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

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