Fractured-Floor Crater

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-9213-9_160-2

Definition

A crater exhibiting a system of floor fractures (rilles/crevasses/troughs/moats) and in some cases uplifted crater floor.

Category

A type of impact crater floor modification.

May be Chaotic crater floor (Mars).

Synonyms

Description

Impact craters with deep fractures of varying widths. At the small end, only single fractures occur on otherwise seemingly normal crater floors; at the large end, only remnant high terrain blocks of the crater floor between wide flat-floored fractures are left. Other distinct features include deep annular moats, blocks, and knobs inside the crater floor. The variety of fractured-floor crater (FFC) shapes is thought to be formed (on Mars) in the following...

Keywords

Depression Mercury Compaction Ghost Breccia 
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Earth and Space Physics, Department of PhysicsUniversity of OuluOuluFinland