Encyclopedia of Medical Immunology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Ian R. Mackay, Noel R. Rose, Dennis K. Ledford, Richard F. Lockey

Gluten Intolerance and Skin Diseases

  • Carlotta Harries
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-9194-1_466

Synonyms

Celiac disease; Dermatitis herpetiformis Duhring; Gluten sensitivity; Nontropical sprue

Definition of Gluten Intolerance

In general gluten sensitivity is mainly considered to be linked with celiac disease (CD).

Common denominator for all patients with celiac disease is the presence of a variable combination of the following:
  • Gluten-dependent clinical manifestations

  • Specific autoantibodies

  • HLA DQ2 and/or DQ8 haplotypes

  • Different degrees of enteropathy (Troncone and Jabri 2011)

However, reports of gluten sensitivity without celiac disease date to 1978, when a patient with normal small bowl biopsies and diarrhea was described which improved within days after starting a gluten-free diet (El-Chammas and Danner 2011). Marsh’s “modern” definition of gluten sensitivity describes “a state of heightened immunological responsiveness to ingested gluten in genetically-predisposed individuals,” with such responsiveness being expressed also in organs other than the gastrointestinal tract...

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Dermatology and AllergologyUniversity Clinic MarburgMarburgGermany