Encyclopedia of Medical Immunology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Ian R. Mackay, Noel R. Rose, Dennis K. Ledford, Richard F. Lockey

Single-Plex Immunoassays and Autoanalyzers

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-9194-1_300

Synonyms

ELISA; FEIA; HytTECH-288; IEMA; Immulite; ImmunoCAP; MAST; RAST; RIST

Definition

Single-plex immunoassays are procedures used in laboratories to detect and quantify individual analytes (antigens or antibodies), one specificity at a time. They involve the manual or computer-automated mixing of individual antigen and antibody reagents together at different steps throughout the assay to permit immune-complex formation and ultimately generation of a final isotopic, colorometric, fluorescent, or chemiluminescent response signal. The measured response is either proportional (noncompetitive binding) or inversely proportional (competitive binding) to the analyte’s concentration following interpolation from a reference curve. This section will use IgE as the model analyte for illustration.

Introduction

The first immunoassay was reported in 1968 for the measurement of human insulin (Berson and Yalow, 2006). They described a competitive-binding reaction in a series of test tubes...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Berson SA, Yalow RS. General principles of radioimmunoassay. 1968. Clin Chim Acta. 2006;369:125–43.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hamilton RG. Proficiency survey based evaluation of clinical total and allergen-specific IgE assay performance. Arch Path Lab Med. 2010;134:975–82.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Matsson P, Hamilton RG, Homburger HA, Esch RE, et al. Analytical performance characteristics and clinical utility of immunological assays for human immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody of defined allergen specificities. 2nd ed. Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute, Wayne, PA, USA, 1/LA20-A; 2008.Google Scholar
  4. Wickman M, Ahlstedt S, Lilja G, van Hage Hamsten M. Quantification of IgE antibodies simplifies the classification of allergic diseases in 4-year-old children. A report from the prospective birth cohort study—BAMSE. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2003;14:441–7.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Wide L, Bennich H, Johansson SGO. Diagnosis of allergy by an in vitro test for allergen antibodies. Lancet. 1967;2:1105.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Medicine and PathologyJohns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Johns Hopkins Dermatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology Reference Laboratory; Johns Hopkins Asthma and Allergy CenterBaltimoreUSA