Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine

Living Edition
| Editors: Marc Gellman, J. Rick Turner

Grief Counseling

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6439-6_862-2

Synonyms

Definition

Grief counseling (also referred to as grief therapy or bereavement counseling) is the term used for the counseling or therapy support that is provided for those who are suffering as a consequence of a loss through the death of someone close to them. Grief counseling may also be used to assist with adjustment to other losses that involve a strong element of grief, such as amputation, loss of role, or divorce. Bereavement therapy may be distinguished from bereavement counseling as being provided for those who are having trouble adjusting, rather than being provided preventively.

Grief counseling developed largely from the 1970s to provide support to people following bereavement in the increasingly fragmented societies of the technologically developed world, in which the religious rites, rituals, and support of more traditional communities had been eroded. Services have traditionally been provided through...

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References and Further Readings

  1. Currier, J. M., Neimeyer, R. A., & Berman, J. S. (2008). The effectiveness of psychotherapeutic interventions for bereaved persons: A comprehensive quantitative review. Psychological Bulletin, 134(5), 648.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Lendrum, S., & Syme, G. (2004). Gift of tears: A practical approach to loss and bereavement counselling (2nd ed.). Hove: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Neimeyer, R. A., & Hogan, N. S. (2001). Quantitative or qualitative? Measurement issues in the study of grief. In M. S. Stroebe, R. O. Hansson, W. Stroebe, & H. Schut (Eds.), Handbook of bereavement research: Causes, consequences and care (pp. 89–118). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Raphael, B., Minkov, C., & Dobson, M. (2001). Psychotherapeutic and pharmacological intervention for bereaved persons. In M. S. Stroebe, R. O. Hansson, W. Stroebe, & H. Schut (Eds.), Handbook of bereavement research: Causes, consequences and care (pp. 587–612). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Worden, J. W. (2009). Grief counselling and grief therapy (4th ed.). London: Tavistock.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of BradfordBradfordUK