Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Living Edition
| Editors: Fred R. Volkmar

Video Modeling/Video Self-Modeling

  • Patricia Prelock
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6435-8_809-3

Definition

Video modeling is the use of video to instruct an individual on desired skills or behaviors by viewing someone demonstrating those skills or behaviors. The video model can take several forms including watching an adult, peer, oneself (also known as video self-modeling), or an animation. This instructional approach is designed to teach new or improve existing skills or behaviors. Video modeling is also used to replace or eliminate challenging or nonproductive behaviors. All behavior viewed on a video model is positive modeling of what should be done versus what should not be done. Inappropriate behaviors or observed errors are removed from the videos. Video modeling helps focus an individual’s attention on the most relevant behaviors in the video so that with practice and rehearsal the individual learns and demonstrates the targeted behavior modeled (Prelock 2006; Prelock et al. 2011). Video modeling helps an individual translate and generalize what they learned in a...

Keywords

Emotion Recognition Perspective Taking Video Modeling Severe Autism Social Initiation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References and Readings

  1. Apple, A. L., Billingsley, F., Schwartz, I. S., & Carr, E. G. (2005). Effects of video modeling alone and with self-management on compliment-giving behaviors of children with high-functioning ASD. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 7(1), 33–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Ayres, K. M., & Langone, J. (2005). Intervention and instruction with video for students with autism: A review of the literature. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 40(2), 183–196.Google Scholar
  3. Bandura, A. (1969). Principles of behavior modification. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.Google Scholar
  4. Bandura, A. (1977). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: Freeman.Google Scholar
  5. Bellini, S., & Akullian, J. (2007). A meta-analysis of video modeling and video self-modeling interventions for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Exceptional Children, 73, 261–284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bellini, S., Akullian, J., & Hopf, A. (2007). Increasing social engagement in young children with autism spectrum disorders using video self-modeling. School Psychology Review, 36, 80–90.Google Scholar
  7. Buggey, T. (2005). Applications of video self-modeling with children with autism in a small private school. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 20, 180–204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Buggey, T. (2012). Video modeling applications for persons with autism. In P. A. Prelock & R. J. McCauley (Eds.), Treatment of autism spectrum disorders: Evidence-based intervention strategies for communication and social interaction (pp. 345–369). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.Google Scholar
  9. Buggey, T. (2013). The use of self-modeling to promote social interactions among young children. Focus on Autism & Other Developmental Disabilities, 28(4), 202–211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Buggey, T., Toombs, K., Gardner, P., & Cervetti, M. (1999). Self-modeling as a technique to train response behaviors in children with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Intervention, 1, 205–214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Burton, C. E., Anderson, D. H., Prater, M. A., & Dyches, T. T. (2013). Video self-modeling on an iPad to teach functional math skills to adolescents with autism and intellectual disability. Focus on Autism & Other Developmental Disabilities, 28(2), 67–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Charlop, M. H., & Milstein, J. P. (1989). Teaching autistic children conversational speech using video modeling. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 22(3), 275–285.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  13. Charlop-Christy, M. H. (2004). Using video modeling to teach perspective taking to children with autism. Presentation at the Annual Vermont Summer Autism Institute, Burlington.Google Scholar
  14. Charlop-Christy, M., & Daneshvar, S. (2003). Using video modeling to teach perspective taking to children with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 36(2), 12–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Charlop-Christy, M., Le, L., & Freeman, K. (2000). A comparison of video modeling with in vivo modeling for teaching children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 30, 537–552.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Corbett, B. A. (2003). Video modeling: A window into the world of autism. The Behavior Analyst Today, 4, 367–375.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. D’Ateno, P., Mangiapanello, K., & Taylor, B. A. (2003). Using video modeling to teach complex play sequences to a preschooler with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 5(1), 5–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Dauphin, M., Kinney, E. M., & Stromer, R. (2004). Using video-enhanced activity schedules and matrix training to teach sociodramatic play to a child with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 6, 238–250.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Delano, M. E. (2007). Improving written language performance of adolescents with Asperger syndrome. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 40(2), 342–351.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Dowrick, P. W., & Dove, C. (1980). The use of self-modeling to improve the swimming performance of spina bifida children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 13, 51–56.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  21. Dowrick, P. W., & Hood, M. (1981). Comparison of self-modeling and small cash incentives in a sheltered workshop. Journal of Applied Psychology, 66, 394–397.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Dowrick, P. W., & Raeburn, J. M. (1995). Self-modeling: Rapid skill training for children with physical disabilities. Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, 7, 25–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Gena, A., Couloura, S., & Kymissis, E. (2005). Modifying the affective behavior of preschoolers with autism using in-vivo or video modeling and reinforcement contingencies. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 35 (5), 545–556.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. Golan, O., & Baron-Cohen, S. (2006). Systemizing empathy: Teaching adults with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism to recognize complex emotions using interactive multimedia. Development and Psychopathology, 18(2), 591–617.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Grandin, T. (2006). Thinking in pictures: And other reports from my life with autism. New York: Vintage Books.Google Scholar
  26. Kazdin, A. E. (1982). Single-case research designs: Methods for clinical and applied settings. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Kehle, T. J., Bray, M. A., Margiano, S. G., Theodore, L. A., & Zhou, Z. (2002). Self-modeling as an effective intervention for students with serious emotional disturbance: Are we modifying children’s memories? Psychology in the Schools, 39(2), 203–207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. LeBlanc, L. A., Coates, A. M., Daneshvar, S., Charlop-Christy, M. H., Morris, C., & Lancaster, B. M. (2003). Using video modeling and reinforcement to teach perspective-taking skills to children with autism. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 36, 253–257.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  29. Maione, L., & Mirenda, P. (2006). Effects of video modeling and video feedback on peer-directed social language skills of a child with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 8(2), 106–118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. National Autism Center. (2009). National Standards Project, Phase 1: Addressing the need for evidence-based practice guidelines for ASD. www.nationalautismcenter.org.
  31. National Autism Center (2015). National Standards Project, Phase 2: Addressing the need for evidence-based practice guidelines for ASD. www.nationalautismcenter.org.
  32. Nikopoulos, C. K., & Keenan, M. (2003). Promoting social initiation in children with autism. Behavioral Interventions, 18(2), 87–108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Nikopoulos, C. K., & Keenan, M. (2004). Effects of video modeling on training and generalisation of social initiation and reciprocal play by children with autism. European Journal of Behaviour Analysis, 5(1), 1–13.Google Scholar
  34. Nikopoulos, C. K., & Keenan, M. (2007). Using video modeling to teach complex social sequences to children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37(4), 678–693.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  35. Ogletree, B. T., & Fischer, M. A. (1995). An innovative language treatment for a child with high functioning autism. Focus on Autistic Behavior, 10, 1–10.Google Scholar
  36. Plavnick, J. B., Sam, A. M., Hume, K., & Odom, S. L. (2013). Effects of video-based group instruction for adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Exceptional Children, 80(1), 67–83.Google Scholar
  37. Prelock, P. A. (2006). Communication assessment and intervention in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Austin: Pro-Ed.Google Scholar
  38. Prelock, P. A., Paul, R., & Allen, E. (2011). Evidence-based treatments in communication for children with autism spectrum disorders. In B. Reichow, P. Doehring, D. V. Cicchetti, & F. R. Volkmar (Eds.), Evidence-base treatments for children with autism (pp. 93–169). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Salvia, J., & Hughes, C. (1990). Curriculum-based assessment: Testing what is taught. New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  40. Sancho, K., Sidener, T. M., Reeve, S. A., & Sidener, D. W. (2010). Two variations of video modeling interventions for teaching play skills to children with autism. Education & Treatment of Children, 33(3), 421–442.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Sansosti, F. J., & Powell-Smith, K. A. (2008). Using computer-presented social stories and video models to increase the social communication skills of children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 10(3), 162–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Scattone, D. (2008). Enhancing the conversation skills of a boy with Asperger’s disorder through social stories and video modeling. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38(2), 395–400.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  43. Sherer, M., Pierce, K. L., Paredes, S., Kisacky, K. L., Ingersoll, B., & Schreibman, L. (2001). Enhancing conversation skills in children with autism via video technology: Which is better, “self” or “other” as a model? Behavior Modification, 25(1), 140–158.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  44. Shipley-Benamou, R., Lutzker, J. R., & Taubman, M. (2002). Teaching daily living skills to children with autism through instructional video modeling. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 4(3), 166–177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Simpson, A., Langone, J., & Ayres, K. M. (2004). Embedded video and computer based instruction to improve social skills for students with autism. Education & Training in Developmental Disabilities, 39(3), 240–252.Google Scholar
  46. Sturmey, P. (2003). Video technology and persons with autism and other developmental disabilities: An emerging technology for PBS. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 5, 3–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Taylor, B. A., Levin, L., & Jasper, S. (1999). Increasing play-related statements in children with autism toward their siblings: Effects of video modeling. Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, 11(3), 253–264.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Wert, B. Y., & Neisworth, J. T. (2003). Effects of video self-modeling on spontaneous requesting in children with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 5, 300–305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Wilson, K. P. (2013). Teaching social-communication skills to preschoolers with autism: Efficacy of video versus in vivo modeling in the classroom. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43, 1819–1831.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Communication Sciences & Disorders, Dean’s OfficeCollege of Nursing & Health SciencesBurlingtonUSA