Pseudoachondroplasia

Living reference work entry

Abstract

Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a type of short-limbed dwarfism, deriving its name from phenotypic similarity to achondroplasia. It is characterized by normal facies, short-limbed dwarfism, joint laxity, and epiphyseal and metaphyseal abnormalities in the growing child.

Keywords

Flare Osteoarthritis Achondroplasia Brachydactyly Pseudoachondroplasia 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Perinatal and Clinical Genetics, Department of PediatricsLSU Health Sciences CenterShreveportUSA
  2. 2.Medical GeneticsShriners Hospitals for ChildrenShreveportUSA

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