Encyclopedia of Metagenomics

Living Edition
| Editors: Karen E. Nelson

Microbial Infection, Leukemia and Lymphoma Associated with

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6418-1_60-4

Introduction

Microbial infections by bacteria, viruses, fungi, and opportunistic pathogens are a common occurrence in leukemia and lymphoma and account for a large share of infections. They cause significant morbidity and mortality to their host. Each malignant disease harbors a unique set of infections, and the frequency of infection depends on the underlying neoplasm and state of the disease. Several predisposing factors such as state of disease, cytotoxicity induced by immunosuppressive medications, intensity and depth of neutropenia, defects in host humoral and cellular defense mechanisms, or immune system impairment can make a patient more susceptible to infection. The infectious agents are present as cofactors and at times as causative agents. Infections and the associated disease are many times endemic to particular geographical area(s). It is estimated that almost 80 % of acute leukemia patients and 70 % of lymphoma patients develop infection during their disease course...

Keywords

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patient Hairy Cell Leukemia Central Nervous System Lymphoma Primary Effusion Lymphoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Texas Medical BranchSealy Center on AgingGalvestonUSA