Diné (Navajo) Ethno- and Archaeoastronomy

Reference work entry

Abstract

The Navajo (Diné) are an Athabascan-speaking people who migrated from the far northwest of America into the desert southwest where they became the largest surviving Native American culture. Three words portray Diné philosophy – beauty, harmony, and balance. Their traditions are rich with astronomical symbolism found in literature, ceremony, iconography, artifacts, rock art, and the sacred landscape. This chapter summarizes Diné astronomical traditions, identification of stars known to be important to the Diné, and how these are depicted on artifacts and rock art.

Keywords

Migration Hunt 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.KanabUSA

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