Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2014 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Ecology and Islam

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6086-2_9328

Ecology is a modern field of investigation that came as a result of the industrialization in Europe. The responses to the ecological issues are therefore modern responses; nevertheless, religious texts may provide further incentives to deal with these issues. Islamic texts that may be consulted to tackle ecological matters are divided into two categories: old and contemporary texts. The original texts consist of the Qur’ān and the saying of the Prophet Muhammad, Hadīth, which forms the basis for legal jurisprudence for the Muslims. In addition, there are several Sufi treatises that approach issues of nature and the relationship between human beings and nature. The second category includes the recent work by Islamic scholars who are addressing the issues of ecology by way of rereading the original texts. The question of ecology in Muslim-majority societies is similar to all nonindustrialized societies; the question has been raised because of its weight in industrialized societies;...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Lebanese American UniversityBeirutLebanon