Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2014 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Jung, Carl Gustav, and Gnosticism

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6086-2_364

In response to persistent charges by his theological critics that he was a Gnostic (Buber 1952; Heisig 1979; Segal 1992; Dourley 1994), Jung insisted that he was neither a Gnostic nor a metaphysician, neither a theist nor an atheist, neither a mystic nor a materialist, but rather an agnostic empirical scientist and an analytical psychologist (Jung 1951–1961, 1952/1973, 1956–1957, 1963). Yet Jung’s enthusiastic engagement with Gnosticism spanned more than four decades, from his early association with G. R. S. Mead and his frequent citation of his translations of Gnostic and Hermetic writings (Goodrick-Clarke and Goodrick-Clarke 2005; Hoeller 1988; Noll 1994) and his 1916 paranormally produced gnostic poem, Septem Sermones ad Mortuos attributed to Basilides of Alexandria (Jung 1916–1992), to his systematic treatment of Gnostic materials transmitted by Patristic sources in Aionin 1951 and the acquisition by the Bollingen Foundation, through the efforts of Gilles Quispel, of the Jung...

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of European Culture and Languages, Religious Studies SectionUniversity of KentCanterburyUK