Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2014 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Jung, Carl Gustav, and Eastern Religious Traditions

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6086-2_363

Jung’s Celebration of Eastern Religious Traditions

C. G. Jung’s dialog with Eastern religious traditions, spanning almost 50 years, was profoundly influential on the development of analytical psychology, enabling him not only to discover cross-cultural confirmation for his clinical research but also to extend his own metapsychological concepts (Jung 1973, 1976; Coward 1985, 1996; Bishop 1992; Clarke 1994; Shamdasani 1996). Based on the assumption that Western consciousness is historically conditioned, is geographically confined, and represents only part of mankind, he argued that Eastern psychology forms the indispensable basis for a critique and objective consideration of Western psychology (Jung 1931/1962, 1950/1955, 1973). Jung’s primary interest was in yoga, a general term for him indicating the spiritual development of the personality within the Hindu, Buddhist, and Taoist religious traditions. Rather than distinguishing between the variety of yoga practices and competing...

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of European Culture and Languages, Religious Studies SectionUniversity of KentCanterburyUK