Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2014 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Analytical Psychology

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6086-2_26

Introduction

Analytical psychology is based on the works of C. G. Jung (1875–1961). The term was first used by Jung when he left the psychoanalytic community around Freud in 1913, to describe a new psychological science with the aim of exploring the unconscious and its relationship with the conscious. The symbol-creating function of the psyche cannot be understood and used for the process of personal development without the conscious. In the course of life, the individual can go through a process of individuation enabling him/her to achieve his/her innate potential and thus give meaning to his/her life.

Jung studied medicine (M.D. in 1900) and underwent additional training in psychiatry (1905) at the Swiss Burghölzli Clinic. His close relationship with Freud lasted from 1907 to 1913. After the painful break from Freud, he underwent several years of auto-analysis, and in 1921 he published his/her work psychological types, which formed the basis for an independent psychological school of...

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nagel & Company Management ConsultingFrankfurtGermany