Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2014 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Amplification

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6086-2_24

Amplification is Jung’s signature method for identifying and accurately applying mythic, historical, cultural, and universal analogies to unconscious material of a collective nature. This can foster engagement with deeper resources in the personality, facilitating individuation. The idea developed as a part of his general study of associations and their dynamics, as when applied to dreams, fantasies, delusions, or hallucinations. In exploring such material as the fund of personal associations becomes depleted yet considerable psychological energy remains with an image, Jung recommended employing parallels from history and culture that drew upon the patterns in the collective unconscious such as myths, legends, folklore, fairy tales, and alchemy. This became a part of his method for identifying understanding emergent symbolic material, as in dreams.

Brief History of the Idea

Although Jung had discussed the use of comparative material from cultural sources in his Fordham University...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Bibliography

  1. Cambray, J., & Carter, L. (Eds.). (2004). Analytical psychology: Contemporary perspectives in Jungian analysis. Hove: Brunner-Routledge.Google Scholar
  2. Casement, A. (Ed.). (1998). Post-Jungians today. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Goodheart, W. B. (1980). Theory of analytic interaction. The San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal, I, 2–39.Google Scholar
  4. Henderson, J. L. (1993). Cultural attitudes in psychological perspective. Toronto: Inner City Books.Google Scholar
  5. Jung, C. G. (1911–1912/1952/1956). The collected works of C. G. Jung: Symbols of transformation (Vol. 5). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Jung, C. G. (1915). On psychological understanding. In G. Adler (Ed.), The collected works of C. G. Jung: The psychogenesis of mental disease (Vol. 3). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Jung, C. G. (1944). The collected works of C. G. Jung: Psychology and alchemy (Vol. 12). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Jung, C. G. (1946/1954/1966). The psychology of the transference. In G. Adler (Ed.), The collected works of C. G. Jung: The practice of psychotherapy (Vol. 16). Princeton: Princeton University.Google Scholar
  9. Jung, C. G. (1947/1954/1969). On the nature of the psyche. In G. Adler (Ed.), The collected works of C. G. Jung: The structure and dynamics of the psyche (Vol. 8). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Jung, C. G. (1953/1961/1966). The collected works of C. G. Jung: Two essays on analytical psychology (Vol. 7). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Jung, C. G. (1958). Flying saucers: A modern myth of things seen in the skies. In G. Adler (Ed.), The collected works of C. G. Jung: Civilization in transition (2nd ed., Vol. 10). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Jung, C. G. (1961). The collected works of C. G. Jung: Freud and psychoanalysis (Vol. 4). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Jung, C. G. (1970). The collected works of C. G. Jung: Civilization in Transition (Vol. 10). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Jung, C. G. (1980). The collected works of C. G. Jung: The symbolic life (Vol. 18). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Pietikainen, P. (1998). Archetypes as symbolic forms. The Journal of Analytical Psychology, 43(3), 325–343. (Responses by A. Stevens; G. B. Hogenson; and H. M. Solomon follow, with a final reply by Pietikainen, all in the same issue.).Google Scholar
  16. Singer, T., & Kimbles, S. (2004). The cultural complex: Contemporary Jungian perspectives on psyche and society. Hove: Brunner-Routledge.Google Scholar
  17. Young-Eisendrath, P., & Dawson, T. (Eds.). (1997). The Cambridge companion to Jung. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Association for Analytical PsychologyProvidenceUSA