Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2014 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Eschatology

  • Emily Stetler
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6086-2_211

The etymology of “eschatology” is ambiguous; the Greek root may be either eschaton, “end time,” or eschata, “final things.” Eschatology is more commonly described using the former understanding and thus defined as “the study of the end time.” In practice, though, eschatology encompasses the latter sense, as well. Particularly in Catholic theology, eschatology has traditionally been defined as being concerned with the so-called four last things: death, judgment, heaven, and hell. (To these four are sometimes added Purgatory and the resurrection of the body.)

Beyond this, though, eschatology also provides the venue for religions to speak of their hope both for the afterlife and for the here-and-now. Increasingly, eschatology also has come to imply a theology of history, as well.

As a theological field, eschatology covers a wide array of topics, for it is concerned with the ultimate fate of the cosmos and of humankind. The unfolding of this drama varies widely, however, across and even...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Bibliography

  1. Abdel Haleem, M. A. S. (Trans.). (2004). The Qur´an. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bultmann, R. (1957). History and eschatology. New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
  3. Bynum, C. (1995). The resurrection of the body in western Christianity. (200–1336). New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Clark, P. (1998). Zoroastrianism. Brighton: Sussex Academic.Google Scholar
  5. Coogan, M. D. (Ed.). (2001). New Oxford annotated Bible. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Le Goff, J. (1984). The birth of purgatory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  7. Levenson, J. (2008). Resurrection: the power of God for Christians and Jews. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Lifton, R. (1976). The life of the self. New York: Simon and Schuster.Google Scholar
  9. Linke, D. (2000). The lord of time: Brain theory and eschatology. In J. Polkinghorne & M. Welker (Eds.), The end of the world and the ends of God (pp. 42–46). Harrisburg: Trinity Press International.Google Scholar
  10. Metz, J.-B. (1980). Faith and history in society. New York: Seabury Press.Google Scholar
  11. Mitchell, D. (2008). Buddhism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Moltmann, J. (1967). Theology of hope. New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
  13. Polkinghorne, J. (2002). The God of hope and the end of the world. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Sauter, G. (1999). What dare we hope? Harrisburg: Trinity Press International.Google Scholar
  15. Watts, F. (2000). Subjective and objective hope. In J. Polkinghorne & M. Welker (Eds.), The end of the world and the ends of God (pp. 47–60). Harrisburg: Trinity Press International.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of TheologyMount St. Mary’s UniversityEmmitsburgUSA